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SHOP WARNING: MONSTER AESTHETICS

plasmidpopper:

elfskull:

Don’t buy from monsteraesthetics. Ever. Under any circumstances.

My boyfriend Bryan Russo ordered a denim vest and a t-shirt from their site in February and spent about 160$ on their products. After a couple months wait, he received the shirt, but he has yet to receive his denim vest and it’s almost fucking September.

Now, both their facebook and website has been saying that production has been delayed due to staff shortages and working Warped Tour. They also dye, sew, and stud their vests by hand, so of course it’s not surprising that it might take them a while to ship products out. That’s understandable, really. But almost eight fucking months? And Bryan had received little to no information as to when or even if he will ever receive his vest that he spent 110$ on.

On July 12th, after Bryan sent them a message on facebook for perhaps the umpteenth time, they replied with this mass message:

Dear Monster Aesthetics Customers,
First and foremost, let me apologize for the mass nature of this email, but efficiency is key as I have recently re-opened this facebook page and noticed the insane lag in responses.
After months and months of playing catch up, somewhere around March we had finally gotten back to a great place, and things were nearly up to date. I (Crystal) left for tour (I tour from around March-November every year), and delegated customer service to a new face in our company. Surprise surprise, they got overwhelmed and gave up on the task.
I assure you, until I just today opened the box to check on a separate order I didn’t know about, I had no idea how far behind customer support was. Our orders@monsteraesthetics.com email account has been frozen out by our server for months, so it’s been between this and my personal email. Things are screwy, but we’ve been very busy trying to get back on top of money so that we can push out all the backordered denim and things. You can’t imagine the bad luck the festival industry has seen this year, and it has directly affected vendors and companies all over, us included.
We don’t have a fulfillment company, or a huge warehouse. We understand that you are used to a speedy turnaround, but the confirmation email we THOUGHT was going out (another server freeze we’re just now becoming aware of), had stated that turnaround could take X amount of time depending.
I will respond to each individual email personally within the next week. I am currently with our company on Vans Warped Tour running the 30x10 feet we brought out this year, and I have next to zero free time but this is important to the company to fix our communication issues. We’ve employed several methods and seemingly nothing has quite caught on. We are a small company and this is a learning curve.
What I ask is that if you have NOT received your order yet, respond to this email with the following:
-Full name from order -4 digit order ID -items missing
And I will more easily be able to get to the bottom of things and possibly send your order from the road if I have things in stock in our tent.
If you have received your order, ignore this email and I’ll be following up with a discount code for the trouble in the near future.
Please bear with us. Our intentions are not to hurt you or take your money. We’re just very understaffed and overwhelmed right now and don’t have the funds to make things right as fast as we wish we could.
Thank you for your understanding,
Crystal and Trevor Monster Aesthetics

He did as instructed, but received no personal e-mail as was promised. Now, again, I understand they’ve probably got an influx of messages from hundreds, maybe thousands of customers. But if that is the case, then they shouldn’t be making promises that they are unable to keep. If they are understaffed, busy with tours, etcet, then why not simply refund the money? Wouldn’t that at least save them some bad publicity? You can already tell by the nature of this e-mail that they are obviously not adept at running an online store.

monsteraesthetics, it is my notion that you at least owe Bryan the 110$ that he paid for the black denim vest. He’s stated multiple times that he doesn’t even want it anymore and lost hope after waiting more than six months for it. Times are hard, and 110$ is a lot of money to a young individual these days. That’s two months worth of a phone bill, three weeks worth of groceries, a month’s worth of gas, invested in your product. After your shameful customer service, a refund is the least you could do.

I ordered 80 dollars worth of stuff from Monster Aesthetics 2 months ago and I haven’t heard anything from the MA team nor have I been able to contact them. I was going to file a dispute , but was not aware that paypal would only let you dispute if it was within 45 days of the purchase. So if you’re considering purchasing from MA PLEASE DON’T, SAVE YOUR MONEY AND DON’T GET SCAMMED.

agabella:

by Eliza Bennett
A Woman’s Work is Never Done
A series of photographic works titled ‘A Woman’s Work is Never Done’ Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand.  By using the technique of embroidery, which is traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of its opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy.  Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ‘ancillary’ jobs, such as cleaning, caring and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. 
The technique, I recall first applying to my hand under a table during a home economics class in school. I was totally amazed to find that I could pass a needle under the top layers of skin without any pain, only a mild discomfort.  As with many childhood whims it passed and I hadn’t thought any more about it until quite recently when I decided to apply the process to my hand to make it appear calloused and work worn like that of a manual labourer. Some viewers consider the piece to be a feminist protest, for me it’s about human value. After all, there are many men employed in caring, catering, cleaning etc… all jobs traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. Such work is invisible in the larger society, with ‘A woman’s work’ I aim to represent it.  (artist statement)
agabella:

by Eliza Bennett
A Woman’s Work is Never Done
A series of photographic works titled ‘A Woman’s Work is Never Done’ Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand.  By using the technique of embroidery, which is traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of its opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy.  Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ‘ancillary’ jobs, such as cleaning, caring and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. 
The technique, I recall first applying to my hand under a table during a home economics class in school. I was totally amazed to find that I could pass a needle under the top layers of skin without any pain, only a mild discomfort.  As with many childhood whims it passed and I hadn’t thought any more about it until quite recently when I decided to apply the process to my hand to make it appear calloused and work worn like that of a manual labourer. Some viewers consider the piece to be a feminist protest, for me it’s about human value. After all, there are many men employed in caring, catering, cleaning etc… all jobs traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. Such work is invisible in the larger society, with ‘A woman’s work’ I aim to represent it.  (artist statement)

agabella:

by Eliza Bennett

A Woman’s Work is Never Done

A series of photographic works titled ‘A Woman’s Work is Never Done’ Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand.  By using the technique of embroidery, which is traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of its opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy.  Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ‘ancillary’ jobs, such as cleaning, caring and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. 

The technique, I recall first applying to my hand under a table during a home economics class in school. I was totally amazed to find that I could pass a needle under the top layers of skin without any pain, only a mild discomfort.  As with many childhood whims it passed and I hadn’t thought any more about it until quite recently when I decided to apply the process to my hand to make it appear calloused and work worn like that of a manual labourer. Some viewers consider the piece to be a feminist protest, for me it’s about human value. After all, there are many men employed in caring, catering, cleaning etc… all jobs traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. Such work is invisible in the larger society, with ‘A woman’s work’ I aim to represent it.  (artist statement)

Juuzou Suzuya

although I suppose if I got a lalala all is good reading it would have been comforting sure, but would have it been helpful? No. As much as I didn’t like what I saw that just means I have to work that much harder to prevent that outcome. 

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